The Great Trek: Witnessing the Pronghorn Antelope Migration Through Grand Teton National Park

The pronghorn antelope migration is one of the most impressive natural phenomena in North America. Each year, these graceful animals travel 150 miles searching for food, water, and suitable breeding grounds. They undertake this journey twice a year, covering the 2nd longest distances of any other land mammal migration in the Western Hemisphere. The longest is the North American caribou. The migration route is a remarkable feat of adaptation and survival, as pronghorns navigate across various terrains, from deserts and grasslands to steep mountain ranges.

Along the way, they encounter numerous challenges, including extreme weather conditions and potential predators. Despite these obstacles, the pronghorn antelope migration remains a testament to the resilience and endurance of these remarkable animals, and it is a breathtaking sight to behold for those lucky enough to witness it. The migration route is between Wyoming’s Upper Green River Basin and Grand Teton National Park. The antelope in Grand Teton National Park were seen daily in the Mormon Row District.

Here is a guide to Grand Teton

For pronghorn antelope in a grassy field
One pronghorn antelope, and a grassy field
Group of pronghorn antelope in a grassy field
Group of pronghorn antelope in a grassy field
Group of pronghorn antelope in a grassy field
Three pronghorn antelope in a grassy field

When does the Pronghorn Antelope migrate?

The pronghorn antelope in Grand Teton National Park, renowned for their remarkable migration patterns, embark on epic journeys. Typically occurring in late spring and early fall, the pronghorn migration is a spectacle that spans a distance across Wyoming.

Click to see our other blog posts on Grand Teton National Park

A Guide to Schwabacher Landing: Grand Teton National Park

Encounters with Wildlife: Moose in Grand Teton National Park

2 Days in Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park and a Mob of Moose

Pronghorn, antelope, grazing
Three pronghorn antelope in a grassy field with trees in the background

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